chat center
SUBSCRIBE MY LINKS:

Latest Posts Full Chatboard Submit Post

Current Issue Table of Contents | Back Issues
 


TEACHERS.NET GAZETTE
Volume 3 Number 10

COVER STORY
"Everybody loves hummingbirds, and they are wonderful tools to excite students about learning."

That quote from a classroom teacher is the basic premise of Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project...

ARTICLES
Meet our Antarctic Guide - A conversation with
USCG LT Marshall Branch
by Kathleen Carpenter, Editor in Chief
The Responsive Classroom: A Practical Approach for Teaching Children to Care by Dr. Belinda Gimbert
Attitudes Toward Numbers Through History by Daniel Chang
Classroom Photos by Members of the Teachers.Net Community
How Many Environments Does a Child Have? by Judith Rich Harris
The Hurried Child, Book Review by Sonja Marcuson
There IS a Printer and a Xerox Machine in Your Classroom That You Can't See! by Dr. Rob Reilly
What's Your Name? by Joy Jones
The funny thing about control: Or to gain control you have to give up control by Karin Ford
Through the eyes of a child - Reflections on teacher and student motivation by Sheree Rensel
Non-Conventional Techniques in Teaching Science by P R Guruprasad
Word Wall Tips from the 4 Blocks Mailring
Teaching Gayle To Read (Part 8) by Grace Vyduna-Haskins
Operation RubyThroat by Bill Hilton Jr.
Dear Old Golden Rule Days, Chapter 4 - Creative Writing by Janet Farquhar
Simple Science Center Ideas from the Early Childhood Mailring
The Freedom Box, Technology for the Blind and Visually Impaired by Dave Melanson
Librarians, Deaf Students and Hearing Students by Linsey Taylor
Pumpkin Math and Writing Activities by Michele Nash
Take Home Literature Activity Bags by Paulie
Favorite October Activities for the Classroom from Teachers.Net Mailrings
Fun Facts
October Columns
October Regular Features
October Informational Items
Gazette Home Delivery:

Best Sellers


Learning Centers (Grades K-4 )
by Michael F. Opitz

$10.36 from Amazon.com
More information

 

Primary Literacy Centers : Making Reading and Writing Stick!
by Susan Nations

$23.95 from Amazon.com
More information

 

Quick-and-Easy Learning Centers: Math (Grades 1-3)
by Patsy Kanter

$10.47 from Amazon.com
More information

 


Teacher Feature...

Simple Science Center Ideas
From the Early Childhood Mailring
[Contributor unknown]


My science center is the popular place in my room. I've collected oodles of stuff over the years. I put things out for themes and also seasons. I change things after a few weeks - sometimes everything, sometimes I take out a few things and put in new. Here are some of my things:

  • Five Senses. Sort things smooth and rough, tuning forks, squishy feely things like you can get at Science stores, smell jars, sound match cannisters made from film containers, kaliedoscopes, magic wands with the glittery stuff inside, the spinning doodle pens, anything pretty like rock crystals, laser disks, etc.
  • Slinky. I made steps on the counter with blocks and lots of masking tape to keep it stable. The kids loved having the slinky go down the steps and then off the counter!
  • Lots of plastic spiders, frogs, lizards (the stretchy kind that you find at science stores), etc.
  • Things I find in nature like lichen covered sticks, seeds, leaves, rocks, etc.
  • Magnet Center. I have a variety of different magnet activities like the guy with magnetic filing hair, things in a plastic jar with water (kids find out magnets work through water as they pull things up the side of the jar by rubbing the magnet on the outside of the jar), magnet sort, push and pull cars (I hot glue magnets on the front and backs of cars/trucks and kids can move cars by magnetic force).
  • Float and Sink discovery tub.


Browse the latest posts from the Classroom Centers Chatboard:

Fun Facts

HOW CAN YOU LIVE WITHOUT KNOWING THESE THINGS?


The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time TV were Fred and Wilma Flintstone.
Every day more money is printed for Monopoly than the US Treasury.
Men can read smaller print than women can; women can hear better.
The Coca-Cola bottle was originally green.
It is impossible to lick your elbow.
The State with the highest percentage of people who walk to work: Alaska
The percentage of Africa that is wilderness: 28% (now get this...) The percentage of North America that is wilderness: 38%
The cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven: $6,400
The average number of people airborne over the US any given hour: 61,000
Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.
The world's youngest parents were 8 and 9 and lived in China in 1910.
The youngest pope was 11 years old.
The first novel ever written on a typewriter: Tom Sawyer.
Those San Francisco Cable cars are the only mobile National Monuments.
Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history:
Spades - King David,
Hearts - Charlemagne,
Clubs -Alexander the Great,
Diamonds - Julius Caesar
111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321
Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn't added until 5 years later.
"I am." is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.
Hershey's Kisses are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it's kissing the conveyor belt.
Q. What occurs more often in December than any other month?
A. Conception.
Q. Half of all Americans live within 50 miles of what?
A. Their birthplace
Q. Most boat owners name their boats. What is the most popular boat name requested?
A. Obsession
Q. If you were to spell out numbers, how far would you have to go until you would find the letter "A"?
A. One thousand
Q. What do bulletproof vests, fire escapes, windshield wipers, and laser printers all have in common?
A. All invented by women.
Q. What is the only food that doesn't spoil?
A. Honey
Q. There are more collect calls on this day than any other day of the year?
A. Father's Day
Q. What trivia fact about Mel Blanc (voice of Bugs Bunny) is the most ironic?
A. He was allergic to carrots.
Q. What is an activity performed by 40% of all people at a party?
A. Snoop in your medicine cabinet.
In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes. When you pulled on the ropes the mattress tightened, making the bed firmer to sleep on. Hence the phrase "goodnight, sleep tight."
It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month we know today as the honeymoon.
~~~~~~~~~~~AND FINALLY~~~~~~~~~~~~
At least 75% of people who read this will try to lick their elbow.
 

#